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Picotte JJ. 1984–2010 trends in fire burn severity and area for the conterminous US Peterson B. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 2016;25(4).
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Long CJ. A 35,000 yr fire history from the Oregon Coast Range, USA. In: Power MJ From Saline to Freshwater: The Diversity of Western Lakes in Space and Time.Vol 536. From Saline to Freshwater: The Diversity of Western Lakes in Space and Time. McLean: GeoScienceWorld; 2018.
He T. A 350-million-year legacy of fire adaptation among conifers Belcher CM. Journal of Ecology. 2016;104(2).
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Smith AM. The ability of winter grazing to reduce wildfire size and fire-induced plant mortality was not demonstrated: a comment on Davies et al. (2015) Talhelm AF. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 2016;25.
DellaSala DA. Accommodating mixed-severity fire to restore and maintain ecosystem integrity with a focus on the Sierra Nevada of California, USA Hutto RL. Fire Ecology. 2017;13(2).
Sparks AM. An accuracy assessment of the MTBS burned area product for shrub-steppe fires in the northern Great Basin, United States Boschetti L. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 2014;24. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/WF14131.
Golladay SW. Achievable future conditions as a framework for guiding forest conservation and management Martin KL. Forest Ecology and Management. 2016;360.
Schoennagel T. Adapt to more wildfire in western North American forests as climate changes Balch JK. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 2017;Online early.
Gucker C. Adapting fuel treatments in a changing climate - Prescribed fire, mechanical treatments, wildfire, and restoration. Northern Rockies Fire Science Network; 2016. Available at: http://nrfirescience.org/resource/15075.PDF icon NRFSNWorkshopSummary3_AdaptingFuelTreatments.pdf (493.6 KB)
Bixler A. Administrative and Judicial Review of NEPA Decisions: Risk Factors and Risk Minimizing Strategies for the Forest Service. (R. Bixler P).; 2016:48 p.PDF icon NEPA_USFS Risks_literature review_LR.pdf (3.19 MB)
Thompson MP, Calkin D, Gilbertson-Day J, Ager AA. Advancing effects analysis for integrated, large-scale wildfire risk assessment. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment. 2011;179:23. Available at: http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs_other/rmrs_2011_thompson_m003.pdf.
LeQuire E. After the Fire is Out.; 2011. Available at: http://www.firescience.gov/Digest/FSdigest10.pdf.
Network FLearning. After the Fire Workshop: Connecting People, Ideas and Organizations.; 2017.PDF icon NotesFromTheField_WA_After-the-Fire.pdf (175.62 KB)
Taylor CM, de Jeu RAM, Guichard F, Harris PP, Dorigo WA. Afternoon Rain More Likely Over Drier Soils. Nature. 2012;489:4. Available at: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v489/n7416/full/nature11377.html.
Anon. The Age of Western Wildfires. Climate Central; 2012. Available at: www.climatecentral.org.PDF icon Wildfires2012.pdf (1.25 MB)
Liu X. Airborne measurements of western U.S. wildfire emissions: Comparison with prescribed burning and air quality implications Huey G. Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres. 2017;Online early.
Long JW. Aligning Smoke Management with Ecological and Public Health Goals Tarnay LW. Journal of Forestry. 2017;115.
Charnley S. All Lands Approaches to Fire Management in the Pacific West: A Typology Kelly EC. Journal of Forestry. 2017;115(1).
Houtman R, Montgomery C, Gagnon A, et al. Allowing a wildfire to burn: estimating the effect on future suppression costs. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 2013;On line early.
Creech MN, Kirkman K, Morris LA. Alteration and Recovery of Slash Pile Burn Sites in the Restoration of a Fire-Maintained Ecosystem. Restoration Ecology. 2012;20:12. Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1526-100X.2011.00780.x/full.

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